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SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- California homeowners will begin getting clearer explanations of how earthquake insurance works and what it covers under legislation signed by Gov. Jerry Brown that is intended to boost lackluster participation in the program.

The governor announced signing AB2064 by Assemblyman Ken Cooley, D-Rancho Cordova, on Thursday.

Law makes earthquake insurance more understandable

SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- California homeowners will begin getting clearer explanations of how earthquake insurance works and what it covers under legislation signed by Gov. Jerry Brown that is intended to boost lackluster participation in the program.

The governor announced signing AB2064 by Assemblyman Ken Cooley, D-Rancho Cordova, on Thursday.

New law tackles high school football collisions head-on

California schools will be forced to limit the number of hours and days their football programs' young athletes can practice tackling and other game-speed hitting plays under a bill signed Monday by Gov. Jerry Brown that responds to concerns over brain injuries that affect thousands of students.

The new law, which takes effect Jan. 1 and applies to all middle and high schools, including private schools, is being welcomed by some coaches but criticized by others, who caution that it could result in more injuries as lesser-prepared athletes take the field.

Law limits school football practices to cut concussions

Football practices at which middle- and high-school students tackle each other will be restricted in California under a law signed on Monday by Democratic Governor Jerry Brown, the latest U.S. effort to minimize brain injuries from the popular sport.

The measure, which limits practices with full-on tackling during the playing season and prohibits them during most of the off-season, comes amid growing concern nationwide over brain damage that can result from concussions among student as well as professional athletes.

Jerry Brown signs bill limiting full-contact football practice in California

Gov. Jerry Brown has signed legislation limiting full-contact football practice for California teenagers, his office announced Monday.

The legislation comes amid increasing concern about brain injuries in football. Assembly Bill 2127, by Assemblyman Ken Cooley, D-Rancho Cordova, prohibits middle school and high school football teams from holding full-contact practices during the off-season and limits them to no more than two full-contact practices per week during the preseason and regular season.

Football: Gov. Brown signs bill restricting contact drills

Gov. Jerry Brown on Monday signed into law AB 2127, which prohibits football teams at public middle and high schools from holding full-contact practices that exceed 90 minutes on a single day, bans teams from holding more than two full-contact practices per week during the season and prohibits teams from conducting contact practices during the off-season.

The new restrictions, which take effect Jan. 1, 2015, are designed to help reduce concussions and other serious brain injuries.

Assemblyman Cooley Wants to Protect High School Football Players From Brain Injuries

(Los Angeles) – California State Assemblyman Ken Cooley (D-Rancho Cordova) has authored legislation that would limit the amount of time that high school and middle school football players can engage in “full contact” practices.  If passed and signed into law, Assembly Bill 2127 would prohibit full contact practices in the off season and limit those practices to two per week during the football season.  AB 2127 would also put procedures into place that would ensure that student athletes don’t return to the playing field too soon after suffering a brain injury.

Parents, coaches and doctors learn ways to prevent concussion among young football players

The diverse group gathered to learn about football techniques that would be legal under a bill authored by Assemblyman Ken Cooley aimed at preventing concussions in high school football players by reducing high-impact contact during field practice.

The event was cosponsored by the UCLA Steve Tisch BrainSPORT Program, Cooley and O'Neil's organization, Practice Like Pros, a nonprofit that's educating college and high school coaches about the benefits of adopting professional teams' approaches to reserving full-contact for game day.