Forgotten Warriors are Community Minded

SACRAMENTO COUNTY, CA – (MPG) As Wind Walker stood in line at the 99 Cent Only Store, he noticed the woman in front of him purchasing a large number of school supplies.

“I asked if she was buying out of her pocket, and she said ‘yes.’ I told her, ‘We’ll bring you books.’”

True to his word, on February 28, 2013, Holly Smith’s second grade class at Main Avenue Elementary School in Sacramento was visited by Walker and a crew of retired combat veterans from Forgotten
Warriors.

Cooley, Eggman Announce Legislation to Allow Return of Parole Violators to State Prison

SACRAMENTO, CA – (MPG) Assembly members Susan Talamantes Eggman and Ken Cooley today announced legislation to allow parole violators to be returned to state prison.

In several high profile cases in California, including at least four in San Joaquin County, dangerous parolees were allowed to continue on parole despite repeat violations, and eventually committed heinous crimes.

Under prison realignment, higher risk offenders are still supervised by state parole, but may no longer be returned to prison for violating parole, and face a maximum of up to 180 days in county jail.

Legislators challenge prison realignment with new wave of bills

Legislators are proposing several bills that add lengthy prison terms for people who violate their parole, which could challenge the state's realignment plan to address overcrowding.

California has been under pressure for years to address chronic overcrowding inside 33 adult prisons. In 2011, federal courts required the state to make drastic reductions in its prison inmate population. Gov. Jerry Brown and the Legislature launched a prison "realignment" that shifted responsibility for thousands of lower-level offenders and parole violators from state prisons to county jails.

Cooley, Eggman announce legislation to allow return of parole violators to state prison

SACRAMENTO – Assembly members Susan Talamantes Eggman and Ken Cooley today announced legislation to allow parole violators to be returned to state prison.

In several high profile cases in California, including at least four in San Joaquin County, dangerous parolees were allowed to continue on parole despite repeat violations, and eventually committed heinous crimes.